Tag Archives: mongolia

Tar Sands for the week (January 21, 2014).

So I put together a little sheet on Canada-Israel extreme extraction links below. Why did I do that? Well, it’s been a strange week for tar sands developments, if you’ll pardon that pun. Almost a week ago, and during his Honor the Treaties tour, Neil Young was revealed to currently have booked an upcoming trip that will include playing before an apartheid audience in Tel Aviv. Young’s incredibly successful, powerful concerts and fund raising endeavor on behalf of legal defense for the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation concluded on Sunday, which not at all coincidentally now kicks off the second Neil Young, solidarity with indigenous resistance campaign– this time, without him.

The possible damage to the struggle in Palestine is already being celebrated by various advocates for Israeli colonialism. Titles such as “Neil Young Proves the Failure of BDS’s “Cultural Boycott” with screeds denouncing people such as Roger Waters or Alice Walker (who wrote an excellent appeal to Alicia Keys, who played Israel last year in defiance of the boycott) have flooded out already. In one of the initial reports, in fact, Israeli apartheid apologists couldn’t conceal their glee in what was supposedly a simple news story at the Jerusalem Post: “With reports of shows by The Rolling Stones, Miley Cyrus and Lady Gaga still in circulation, 2014 is shaping up to be one of Israel’s most active for musical imports. Did someone mention boycott?” Continue reading

Tar Sands World for the week (January 7, 2014)

A separate economic note brought a slightly older story to light for me today. It seems that in Mongolia last June, which is just two months after the announcement of new mining contracts with US company Genie Energy to extract kerogen-based oil shale, Mongolian start up corporation HB Oil announced a deal to buy into a refinery by the name of Sungri in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or north Korea.

 

At the time of the announcement the link to the oil shale developments was not made, however Chinese influenced Mongolian MAK and Genie have now been linked to the possible future feedstock of the DPRK located refinery. Accordingly, it seems that US owned and Zionist-conceived Genie Energy (whose advisory board includes Rupert Murdoch, Lord Jacob Rothschild and Dick Cheney, among other prominents of reaction) may now be teaming up in a round about way (Mongolia has nearly no known conventional oil) to open up the “final frontier” of commercial oil to decimate the climate.

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Tar Sands World for the week (December 10, 2013)

Tar Sands World for the week (December 10, 2013)

 

CNN ran a story, written elsewhere, detailing the long term energy from shale goals coming out of Estonia. Estonia, a country and region you might as well get used to reading me raise the alarm over so far as extreme energy plays, produces more electricity from oil shale pyrolysis that it currently consumes. Problem, of course, is that this energy development is dirtier than coal, never mind tar sands.

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Colonialism, Mining and Oil Shale: Don’t Let the Genie Out of the Bottle

June 12, 2013
Colonialism, Mining and Oil Shale: Don’t Let the Genie Out of the Bottle

Mongolia, Canada, Israel & the United States

by MACDONALD STAINSBY
originally published in Counterpunch

Ulan Bator: When you get out of the plane and enter the Chinngis Khan Airport just outside of Ulan Bator, you quickly realize that Mongolia is a former Soviet Republic. An incredibly drab and oddly out of date international airport, the walls of the customs area have peeling paint and general disorganization as you struggle to figure out where any line up for customs begins and ends. You can see the stone faced bureaucrats and soldiers in seemingly dated uniforms standing around while you’re getting ready to show off the required prearranged visa. After you stumble your way through that mess, you get to the conveyor belt that jams with luggage bags that are apparently much larger now on average than when it was first constructed. The feeling of being in a time warp lasts– right up until you step outside for the first time.

Immediately upon getting outside, in the dark and on a chilly night reminiscent of northern Canada despite the date being in the middle of May, I was confronted by a man from my home province of British Columbia, Canada. Skipping the usual opening conversation about the ongoing hockey playoffs I normally attempt with ex-pats carrying the same passport as I, he told me immediately that he was working for one of the large mining companies.

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